• Crohn's disease is an ongoing disorder that causes inflammation of the digestive tract, also referred to as the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Crohn's disease can affect any area of the GI tract, from the mouth to the anus, but it most commonly affects the lower part of the small intestine, called the ileum. The swelling extends deep into the lining of the affected organ. The swelling can cause pain and can make the intestines empty frequently, resulting in diarrhea. Click here for more information about Crohn's Disease.
    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic, or long-lasting, disease that causes inflammation and sores, called ulcers, in the inner lining of the large intestine, which includes the colon and the rectum-the end part of the colon. Click here for more information about Colitis.
    Many people have small pouches in the lining of the colon, or large intestine, that bulge outward through weak spots. Each pouch is called a diverticulum. Multiple pouches are called diverticula. The condition of having diverticula is called diverticulosis. Click here for more information about Diverticulitis.
    Hirschsprung disease (HD) is a disease of the large intestine that causes severe constipation or intestinal obstruction. Click here to learn more about Hirschsprung's Disease.
    A variety of digestive cancers, such as colon and colorectal cancer, ovarian and cervical cancer, and bladder cancer, can result in the need for an ostomy. In this article about digestive cancers we review some of the more common cancers and treatments.
    A colostomy is a surgically-created opening in the abdomen through which a small portion of the colon is brought up to the surface of the skin. Click here to learn more about Colostomies.
    An ileostomy is a surgically-created opening in the abdomen through which the end of the ileum is brought up to the surface of the skin. Click here for more information about Ileostomies.
    A urostomy, or urinary diversion, is a surgically-created opening in the abdomen that allows urine to pass directly out of the body. Click here to learn more about Urostomies.
    The stoma refers to the piece of intestine that you see on your belly. No matter what type of ostomy you have, stomas have common features. To learn more about Stoma/Skin care, please click here.
    There are many support groups committed to improving the quality of life for people who have or will have an intestinal or uniary diversion. To find out more about your ostomy support options, click here.
    You left the hospital wearing a pouch that was chosen for you by the WOC Nurse or hospital nurse. There are many types and brands of ostomy pouching systems and accessories on the market. Once you feel confident with your ostomy care, you may want to try other products. Sometimes, a change in products is necessary due to allergies, body changes, or insurance coverage. Click here to learn more about the various Ostomy products available to you.
    The most important thing about traveling is to not forget your supplies! Click here for more travel tips.
    Become aware of the effects of food on your stool. There are foods that loosen stool, thicken stool, and those that cause gas and odor. To learn more about the effects of foods you eat, click here.
    In time, you can return to a satisfying sexual relationship. It will not be the ostomy, but your attitude toward your ostomy that will affect your relationships with others. It is normal to feel sensitive about the change in your body image. Some surgical procedures can affect sexual function, which is usually discussed prior to surgery by your doctor and WOC Nurse. For more helpful tips, click here
    You can live an active lifestyle with an ostomy. You just have to believe that you can! It will take time and some adjustments, but you will be able to do normal things, like going out to eat, working and enjoying leisure activities. Click here to find out more.
    You can live an active lifestyle with an ostomy. You just have to believe that you can! It will take time and some adjustments, but you will be able to do normal things, like going out to eat, working and enjoying leisure activities. Click here to find out more.
    You can live an active lifestyle with an ostomy. You just have to believe that you can! It will take time and some adjustments, but you will be able to do normal things, like going out to eat, working and enjoying leisure activities. Click here to find out more about excercising with your ostomy.
    Liberty Medical offers a wide variety of Ostomy related News and Resources, click here for the latest information.
    Liberty Medical is committed to the improvement of the quality of life of people who have, or will have, an intestinal or urinary diversion. Click here for a list of support groups.
    Coming Soon

OSTOMY CARE AND HEALTH CONDITION CENTER

  • Get Back to Living—With Ostomy Support From Liberty Medical

    Health Conditions: OstomyAlthough exact statistics are difficult to nail down, one thing is for certain: hundreds of thousands of people live actively with ostomies. Great Britain’s Queen Mum (who lived to be over 100) had one. Former Vice President Hubert Humphrey and Pope John Paul II had one. Professional actors and athletes have all lived with an ostomy. It may take some time, but like them, you too will learn to live more comfortably with your condition. And Liberty Medical is here to help.

  • OSTOMY ARTICLES

    Rare gene mutation in young people increases risk for colon cancer

    For Ansleigh Adkins, a 12-year-old girl recently diagnosed with FAP, the risks related to the genetic mutation and the predisposition it gives her for developing colon cancer later in life are real.

    Read More

    Studies find bacteria in the mouth may lead to colorectal cancer

    According to two studies published by the journal Cell Host & Microbe, a type of gut microbe in the mouth may be linked to the formation of cancer-causing tumors.

    Read More

    Ulcerative colitis linked to better patient outcomes in older people

    Can patients diagnosed with ulcerative colitis have better outcomes overall if they're diagnosed later in life?

    Read More

    Annual ride for Crohn's disease and colitis increases awareness, raises funds and cultivates hope

    This year's Get Your Guts in Gear Ride for Crohn's and Colitis will be held on August 23 to August 25 in Wisconsin to increase awareness, raise funds for research and treatment, and cultivate hope for...

    Read More

    Crohn's disease patients can eat smart in 2013

    With the new year just beginning, it is the perfect time to make a couple of New Year's resolutions. If you have Crohn's disease, this is an ample opportunity to alter what you eat to help reduce symptoms,...

    Read More

  • OSTOMY RESOURCES

    Living with an Ostomy - Part 1

    Information Provided by ConvaTec®ClothingDon't worry - you will not need a new wardrobe. Modern ostomy pouches are inconspicuous under almost any kind of clothing because they're designed to lie flat against...

    Living with an Ostomy - Part 2

    If you’ve recently come home after surgery, you may be feeling anxious about caring for your ostomy. You and your family, most likely, have learned basic ostomy education in the hospital.  Emptying your...

    What is an Ostomy?

    Information Provided by ConvaTec®Caring For Your StomaA stoma (the Greek word for "mouth") is shiny, wet, and red in color, similar to the inside lining of your mouth. It will usually have a round or oval...

    What is a Colostomy

    Information Provided by ConvaTec®  The Human Digestive SystemThe digestion and absorption of nutrients, as well as the storage and elimination of fecal waste, take place within the gastrointestinal system,...

    What is an Ileostomy?

    Information Provided by ConvaTec®THE HUMAN DIGESTIVE SYSTEM  The digestion and absorption of nutrients, as well as the storage and elimination of fecal waste, take place in the gastrointestinal...

    What is a Urostomy?

    Information Provided by ConvaTec®THE HUMAN URINARY SYSTEM  The kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra make up the urinary tract. The kidneys, two bean-shaped organs located just below...

    Ostomy Lifestyle and Nutrition Information

    You can live an active lifestyle with an ostomy. You just have to believe that you can! It will take time and some adjustments, but you will be able to do normal things, like going out to eat, working...

    Ostomy Product Knowledge

    You left the hospital wearing a pouch that was chosen for you by the WOC Nurse or hospital nurse. There are many types and brands of ostomy pouching systems and accessories on the market.Once you feel...

    Ostomy Support

    The Do’s of Ostomy CareDo measure your stoma weekly for 8 weeks, then as needed.Do change your pouch when the stoma is least active, usually before eating and drinking.Do change your pouch at least 1-2...
  • Look to Liberty to Make Your Ostomy Care Easier

    Our dedicated, specially trained patient service representatives understand ostomy care and how crucial it is to follow your health care provider’s instructions. You can trust our representatives to answer even the most delicate questions knowledgably and with utmost sensitivity.

    Liberty accepts Medicare assignments for over a thousand ostomy items and accessories, including the top brand-name ostomy products. If you have Medicare or major medical insurance, your ostomy supplies may be covered.** We even fill out your claim forms for you. We package the products you order discreetly to protect your privacy and ship them FREE of charge directly to your home.

    Call Liberty, Today

    Visit our ostomy supplies page for details or call us at 1-800-705-5797 with no obligation. You can count on Liberty for:

    1. Expert customer support from trained patient service representatives
    2. Discreet home delivery  
    3. FREE shipping on all ostomy supplies
    4. No up-front expense**
    5. Reorder reminders
    6. Our special No-Risk Guarantee*

    Ask us if your insurance provider participates in our program.